Punyesi Vipassana Meditation Retreats (2-10 & 14-23 Sep 2015)

What: Vipassana Meditation Retreats
When: 2 September- 23 September 2015 (2 retreats from 2-10 & 14-23)
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
Who: Ajarn Kanchana Punyesi & Ajarn Kanya Dhammapalee

Upcoming Program of Punyesi Vipassana Retreat on September 2015          

Arjan Kanchana Punyesi (Yoobamrung) is a vipassana-insight meditation teacher at Punyesi Vipassana Retreat, Loei, Thailand. Arjan Kanchana was born on August 6, 1970. She is 44 years old and has experience to study Dharma with Sayadaw Pattantavirojana, NguTao U Temple in Chan State, Myanmar.

For information and registration, see www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/boddhichitta-retreat-2/

Bodhicitta Retreat (24 Jul – 2 Aug @ Deer Park)

What: Bodhicitta Retreat
When: 24 July – 2 August 2015
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
Who: Geshe Dorji Damdul

This retreat will focus on practise of “Boddhicitta,” the “awakened/altruitic mind,” which is ever-present as a seed in us, all sentient beings. The path to nurture and awaken this, will be based from the Buddha Shakyamuni’s teachings, specifically the Four Seals.

About Geshe Dorji Damdul

Since 2005, Geshe Dorji Damdul has served as the official translator to H.H. the Dalai Lama. Geshela, has completed his studies from Institute of Buddhist Dialectics (IBD) in Dharamsala, Drepung Monastic University and Gyumed Tantric College. Serving as a fellow in Cambridge University, England in 2003,  he was appointed as a visiting fellow at Delhi University to give lectures in three of the University’s departments – Philosophy, Psychology, and Buddhist Studies. Presently, he is serving as the Director of Tibet House, Cultural Center of H.H. the Dalai Lama, New Delhi. He gives lectures and leads philosophy classes and meditation retreats in Tibet House, Delhi University and other venues. He also travels widely in India and abroad, to teach Buddhist philosophy and practice.

For information and registration, see www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/boddhichitta-retreat

The Wisdom Chapter of “The Way of the Boddhisattva” (9-13 May @ Deer Park)

What: Teachings on the Wisdom Chapter of “The Way of the Boddhisattva” by Shantideva
When: 9-13 May 2015
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
Who: Khenpo Sonam Tsewang

Teachings on the Wisdom Chapter of “Way of the Boddhisattva”

The “Ketaka Gem” (Tib. Norbu Ketaka, Wyl. nor bu ke ta ka), a commentary on the ninth chapter of the Bodhicharyavatara written by Mipham Rinpoche, based on the teachings of Patrul Rinpoche. It was composed in 1878, when Mipham Rinpoche was 32.

Lhobpon Rechunpa said:

“From the emanation of Lokeshvara, Dza Paltrul Rinpoche, [Mipham Rinpoche] received the Wisdom Chapter of the Bodhicharyavatara in only five days. Based on this, he wrote the commentary on the Wisdom Chapter known as the She Drel Keta Ka.”

Mipham Rinpoche himself said:

“When I was young, I was present when many accomplished, learned lamas gave Dharma teachings, but I only seriously studied Dza Patrul Rinpoche’s teachings on the Wisdom Chapter of the Bodhicharyavatara. Later, in dependence on the kindness of my venerable lama and Manjushri, no difficulties with study ever arose for me.”

In the ninth chapter of Nectar of Manjushri’s Speech, Khenpo Kunpal’s commentary on the whole Bodhicharyavatara, Khenpo Kunpal closely followed (almost verbatim) Mipham Rinpoche’s Norbu Ketaka.

About the Teacher

Khenpo Sonam Tsewang is a khenpo (equivalent of Professor of Buddhism) at Ngagyur Nyingma Institute, the advanced center of philosophical study at Namdroling Monastery, Bylakkuppe. He finished his graduation in Buddhism from Central Institute of Higher Tibetan Studies, Varanasi and also from Ngagyur Nyingma Institute, Namdroling. He has translated for His Holiness Penor Rinpoche and Khenchen Pema Sherab Rinpoche on many occasions. He published published English translations of books such as “How to Follow a Spiritual Master”, “The All Pervading Melodious Sound of Thunder : the Outer Liberation Story of Terton Migyur Dorje” and “Drops of Nectar”. He was enthroned as a Khenpo (equivalent of Professor of Philosophy) at Namdroling Monastery in 2010 by His Holiness Karma Kuchen Rinpoche. Khenpo Sonam travels extensively with his root Guru, Khenchen Pema Sherab Rinpoche, for international teaching tours. In the process, he is also receiving close personal guidance and spiritual instructions from Khen Rinpoche.

For more information, see www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/teachings-on-the-wisdom-chapter-of-way-of-the-boddhisattva

“A Darshan in Vimalakirti Sutra” with Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche (28-29 April @ Deer Park)

What: A Darshan in Vimalakirti Sutra
When: 28-29 April 2015
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
Who: Dzongsar Khyentse Rinpoche

The Vimalakīrti Nirdeśa Sūtra (Sanskrit: विमलकीर्तिनिर्देशसूत्र) or Vimalakīrti Sūtra is a Mahayana Buddhist sutra. Sometimes used in the title, the word nirdeśa means “instruction, advice”. The sutra teaches, among other subjects, the meaning of nondualism. It contains a report of a teaching addressed to both arhats and bodhisattvas by the upāsaka (lay practitioner) Vimalakīrti, who expounds the doctrine of śūnyatā to them. This culminates with the wordless teaching of silence. The sutra has been influential in East Asian Buddhism for its “brash humor” and flexibility. It has also been influential in Mahayana Buddhism for its inclusiveness and respect for non-monastic practitioners as well as stating the equal role of women in Buddhism.

Darśana (also Darśan or Darshan; Sanskrit: दर्शन) is a term meaning “auspicious sight” (in the sense of an instance of seeing or beholding and being seen or beheld at the same time; from a root dṛś “to see”), vision, apparition, or glimpse. It is most commonly used for theophany, “manifestation / visions of the divine” in Hindu worship, e.g. of a deity (especially in image form), or a very holy person or artifact. One could also “receive” darshana or a glimpse of the deity in the temple, or from a great saintly person, such as a great guru.

Nagarjuna, one of the most important Indian Buddhist philosophers, wrote in his Mūlamadhyamakakārikā (Fundamental Verses on the Middle Way) that the wise person perceives true reality (tattva-darśana). In Mahayana Buddhist philosophy, darśana came to be an important concept. As scholar Paul Harrison has noted: “By the second century CE, then, the vision of the Buddha (buddha-darśana) and the accompanying hearing of the Dharma (dharma-śravaṇa) are represented as a transformative experience of decisive importance for practitioners, be they renunciants or householders.”  The term darśana-citta (a seeing mental event) became an important term in Sanskrit Abhidharma literature. Indian Mahayana philosophers Vasubandhu and Asanga divided the Buddhist path(marga) into five paths, of which the third is the “path of seeing” (darśana-marga).

For more information, see www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/a-darshan-in-vimalakirti-sutra/

Madhyamakavatara Retreat (14-23 April @ Deer Park)

What: Ten-day Retreat on Madhyamakavatara (Entry into the Middle Way) by Acharya Chandrakirti
When: 14-23 April 2015
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
Who: Ven. Geshe Dorji Damdul

Acharya Chandrakirti’s Madhyamakavatara is a classic commentary on Arya Nagarjuna’s Mulamadhyamakakarika. It elucidates the true import of Arya Nagarjuna’s mangnum opus by clearly bringing out the meaning of the Ultimate Reality through an insight into Dependent Origination. Madhyamakavatara also expands upon several points in the Sutra of the Ten Bhumis (Dashabhumika Sutra).

The path to enlightenment can be viewed in terms of the ground, path and result. The ground is the two truths of emptiness and dependent origination. The path consists of the wisdom and method, which one engages in through understanding the two truths; emptiness being the basis of the wisdom aspect and dependent origination of the method aspect. The result can be seen as two-fold as well, the realisation of wisdom gives rise to the dharmakaya and of the method aspect of the path to the rupakaya. Thus, understanding the two truths leads to the two paths, which in turn leads to the two resultant states of the dharmakaya and the rupakaya. This text covers the profound aspect of Arya Nagarjuna’s Mulamadhyamakakarika, whose subject matter can be understood in essence as emptiness, as well as the vast aspect related to the paths and the bhumis.

Ven. Geshe Dorji Damdul la will also bring in explanations from “‘Thorough Elucidation of the Intent: An Extensive Exposition of ‘Entering the Middle Way’”, by Lama Tsongkhapa, one of the most elaborate and precise commentaries on Acharya Chandrakirti’s text.

For information, see www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/madhyamakavatara-entry-into-the-middle-way-by-acharya-chandrakirti/

An Introductory Buddhist Retreat with Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo (3-5 April @ Deer Park)

What: Easter Retreat, “An introductory Buddhist retreat” (View, Meditation, Action)
When: 3-5 April 2015 (9am-12noon & 3-5pm)
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
Who: Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo

An intensive study-practise retreat aimed to introduce new students to Buddhadharma and refresh “old”students!

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo is a renowned Buddhist teacher, popular worldwide for her warm, clear and down-to-earth presentation of the Dharma and its application in daily life. The inspiring story of her life, including 12 years of secluded retreat in a Himalayan cave, is the subject of a well-known biography, “Cave in the Snow”. Jetsunma is the founder and abbess of Dongyu Gatsal Ling Nunnery near Tashijong, H.P (www.tenzinpalmo.com).

For information: www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/easter-retreat-an-introductory-buddhist-retreat-view-meditation-action/

Lojong: Mind Training with Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo (22-23 March @ Deer Park)

What: Teachings on mind training (Tib: lojong)
When: 22-23 March 2014
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
Who: Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo

Jetsunma Tenzin Palmo is a renowned Buddhist teacher, popular worldwide for her warm, clear and down-to-earth presentation of the Dharma and its application in daily life. The inspiring story of her life, including 12 years of secluded retreat in a Himalayan cave, is the subject of a well-known biography, “Cave in the Snow”. Jetsunma is the founder and abbess of Dongyu Gatsal Ling Nunnery near Tashijong, H.P

http://www.tenzinpalmo.com

For information: www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/mind-training-lojong/

Silent Meditation Retreat (17-24 March at Dharmalaya)

Group Sit

What: Silent Meditation Retreat with SanghaSeva
WhereDharmalaya Institute in Bir, HP, India
When: 17-24 March 2014
Who: Zohar Lavie & Nathan Glyde
Language: English

Description: Residential silent meditation retreat led by Zohar Lavie and Nathan Glyde of SanghaSeva. Simple accommodation in tents/dormitory in a beautiful Himalayan setting.

Note: Space is limited, so advance registration and deposit are required. 

For details and registration, please visit the SanghaSeva website.

“Subtle Consciousness Meditation” Retreat (4-9 Dec @ Deer Park)

What: “Subtle Consciousness Meditation” Retreat
Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir
When: 4-9 December, 2013
Who: Ven. Sudhammacara

This ‘Subtle Consciousness Meditation Retreat’ is based on the One Dharma Meditation Method compiled by Ven. Sudhammacara. It consists of three kinds of practice: mindfulness of body sensation, compassion meditation and ana-pana sati (mindfulness of in-breath and out-breath).

These practices enable us to dwell in the present moment.  Here and now, we gradually uncover our Subtle Consciousness which is usually clouded by our deluded, non-stop thinking. We go back to our true home with peace and joy after travelling abroad painfully so many years.In the end, we are finally discovering who we really are.

These intensive silent retreats will include regular sessions of sitting and walking meditation, accompanied by Dharma teachings and personal guidance. The retreats are open to both beginners and experienced meditators. From this year, the retreat will include Yoga classes. These will be led by Reiko Azuma, who has been teaching Yoga in Ven. Sudhammacara’s meditation retreats in Japan and Taiwan. Meditators get much benefit from Yoga exercises.

Guests and visitors who are not able to attend the whole retreat may attend some sessions only, but are requested to maintain silence around the meditation hall and dining area, to support the retreatants.

Teacher: Ven. Sudhammacara

Ven.Sudhammacara was ordained in the Japanese Soto Zen tradition in 1983, under Kosho Uchiyama Roshi lineage. He practiced and taught zazen meditation for more than 18 years, including several years spent teaching at Valley Zendo in Massachusetts, USA.

In 2001, he took Theravadan Bhikku ordination in the Burmese forest monk tradition under Pa-Auk Sayadaw, and trained in shamatha (calm abiding) and vipassana (insight) meditation in Burma and Sri Lanka. Since 2006, he has also been exposed to the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. Now he calls himself One Dharma Buddhist monk.

Ven. Sudhammacara has been a regular visiting teacher at Deer Park, where he offers mindfulness meditation retreats, since autumn 2007. Most of the year, he lives in Kamakura, Japan, where he teaches meditation at his centre Ippo-an (One Dharma Forum). He also leads meditation retreats in several sacred places (Kyoto, Kudaka-jima and Mitake-san) in Japan.

Ven. Sudhammacara  brings experience from the Japanese Zen tradition, the Theravada forest tradition of Burma, and the Tibetan Buddhist tradition. Ven.Sudhammacara’s vast experience has shown him the pitfalls of commonly practiced meditations. His careful avoidance of Buddhist terms that can easily slip into jargon, makes retreatants rethink or let go of Buddhist conceptualizations (that many often automatically rely on, thinking they already understand the meaning without renewed consideration).

As well as this five-day silent mindfulness retreat, Ven Sudhammacara will also lead daily meditations and Dharma talks at Deer Park in early December.

For information: www.deerpark.in/programs/schedule/subtle-consciousness-meditation-retreat/

Introduction to the Philosophy of Yogacara (11-12 Nov @ Deer Park)

What: Introductory seminar on the philosophy of Yogacara

When: 11-12 Nov, 2013

Where: Deer Park Institute, Bir

Who: Ven. Dhammadipa

Now 60 years old, Venerable Dhammadipa (lay name Thomas Peter Gutman) was born in Czechoslovakia in 1949. He studied Chinese Literature and Philosophy at Prague University, graduating in 1969, and then studied Russian literature at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem, where he received a degree in 1973.

In the late seventies Venerable began his Buddhist studies in Berlin, where he had immigrated as a refugee after the Soviet invasion of Czechoslovakia. In 1977 he received a master’s degree in Chinese literature and philosophy at the University of Paris. In 1979, he enrolled at Nalanda University in India (where he also taught French and German) to study Sanskrit and Buddhist Philosophy. After receiving a degree at Nalanda in 1984, he returned to serve as the Associate Librarian at Berlin University.

In 1986, Venerable Dhammadipa went to Japan and studied under Zen Master Harada Serrei Roshi of the S t school (Caodong in Chinese) practice. He was given a Dharma name as Xing-Kong (meaning Nature of Emptiness).

In 1987, with the encouragement of Venerable Athurugiriye Nyanavimala Mahathera, Venerable Wijayasoma Mahathera, and Venerable Dikwelle Mahinda, he ordained as a monk in Meetirigala and was given a Dharma name as Dhammadipa (island of Buddhism or Dharma). He received the full Theravada Bhiksu ordination in Sri Lanka where he practiced meditation under the guidance of his preceptor, Venerable Nanarama Mahathera. In 1989, he received the Three Fold ordination as a Mahayana Monk in Hsi Lai Temple, Los Angeles and began Dharma teaching in US, Germany and Taiwan.

In 1996, Venerable went to Myanmar to practice meditation with the contemporary master Venerable Pa Auk Sayadaw, and was recognized by the Sayadaw to be first of the Sayadaw’s Western disciples qualified to teach meditation. He has since been teaching Samatha (tranquil mental states) and Vipassana (direct seeing of the Dharma) meditation at monasteries and universities worldwide.

Venerable Dhammadipa speaks Czech, French, German, English, Russian, and fluent Chinese. He reads and translates Buddhist texts from Pali and Sanskrit. His translated works in French and Czeck include Treatise on the Awakening of Faith in the Mahayana (Mahayanasraddhotpada-sastra), Entry into the Bodhisattva Path (Bodhicaryavatara) and a Collection of Han-San’s Poems. His teachings in Taiwan have been compiled and printed in Chinese.

Over the years Venerable has presented dharma teachings and led meditation retreats around Europe, North America, Taiwan and mainland China, India and Southeast Asia. Personally he has a gentle and easy going manner. His teaching follows the framework of the classic Theravada Buddhist commentary The Path of Purity (Pali: Visuddhimagga): one starts with training in the precepts (virtue) which lays the foundation for training in concentration and then the development of wisdom. Venerable teaches that knowledge of the Buddhist way should be applied in practice and verified first hand through direct experience. One should make a great vow to tread the way and realize the dharma for the benefit of all sentient beings.